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‘In Conversation With’ Series ft. Prof. Ebun Clark + Olufisayo Bakare (PART 1)

For the debut interview of our ‘In Conversation With’ series, we are joined by Prof. Ebun Clark and Olufisayo Bakare discussing with Moni Aisida, Gallery manager of Affinity Art Gallery. The purpose of this series is to bring to the fore, relevant topics that revolve around the state of the art industry and its many […]

For the debut interview of our ‘In Conversation With’ series, we are joined by Prof. Ebun Clark and Olufisayo Bakare discussing with Moni Aisida, Gallery manager of Affinity Art Gallery. The purpose of this series is to bring to the fore, relevant topics that revolve around the state of the art industry and its many diverse stakeholders.

For this first interview spurred by the occasion of the all-female exhibition I AM & … NOTHING ELSE, they tackle topics stemming from the representation of women artists in conversations about legacy, impact and inspiration throughout art history, specifically, Nigerian art history. Through the conversation, several other topics are touched on such as the art of collecting and the importance of documentation and archiving, a topic an experienced collector like Prof. Clark with five decades worth of collecting experience, had much to contribute.

It has been unprecedentedly difficult in the past couple of years for all of us. Despite the differences of opinion, perhaps the biggest takeaway of this time has been how deeply interconnected our lives really are, and how crucial it is to listen to one another, learn from the past and work together, to ensure a more equitable future for all.

If being a woman in this world is difficult, then being a woman in the art world can be doubly challenging. With this backdrop in mind, this first part is focused on why female artists in Nigeria seem to be absent in art history conversations.

Striving for equity is not just a matter of doing the right thing but also ensuring that a more accurate history is told. The current disparity is particularly disheartening when we consider the impact female artists have had on the entire history of art.

Some of today’s greatest artists, both male and female, acknowledge the vast impact of women artists on their work. This is one of the biggest oversights and unspoken hypocrisies of the art market today. Nevertheless, galleries bear a part of the responsibility for correcting these biases.

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